American Paintings and Sculpture
PrevNext1 of 5
Photo credit: Yale University Art Gallery
Full-size image not available for download. Please contactRights and Reproductions.
PrevNext2 of 5
Photo credit: Yale University Art Gallery
Full-size image not available for download. Please contactRights and Reproductions.
PrevNext3 of 5
Photo credit: Yale University Art Gallery
Full-size image not available for download. Please contactRights and Reproductions.
PrevNext4 of 5
Makers mark
Photo credit: Yale University Art Gallery
Full-size image not available for download. Please contactRights and Reproductions.
PrevNext5 of 5
Full-size image not available for download. Please contactRights and Reproductions.
Artist: Alexander Calder, American, 1898–1976

Fourth Flurry ‘48

1948

Painted sheet metal and wire

80 x 76 1/2 in., 4 lb. (203.2 x 194.3 cm, 1.81 kg) other (H): 80 in.(203.2 cm) other (W): 76 1/2 in.(194.3 cm)
Gift of Katherine S. Dreier to the Collection Société Anonyme
1948.298
This three-dimensional work consists of approximately thirty white discs of graduated size attached to metal wires of various weights and lengths. This type of suspended sculpture is known as a “mobile,” the term that Marcel Duchamp suggested for Alexander Calder’s unique form of sculpture that moved in response to natural forces. Fourth Flurry ‘48 sways and shifts in response to air currents and the counterbalances of gravity, creating a constantly changing, asymmetrical yet balanced composition. Looking up at the slowly moving sculpture, the viewer is presented with a sensation evocative of a wide variety of natural forms and systems in motion, from snowflakes to solar systems, from atoms to galaxies. At the same time, this airy graceful sculpture functions on purely abstract terms. The white circular shapes, which create a rhythm through their repetition, are juxtaposed with the black-painted wire lines, creating a whimsical, abstract drawing in space.
Culture: 
American
Period: 
20th century
Classification: 
Sculpture
Status: 
Not on view
Bibliography: 

Ruth L. Bohan et al., The Société Anonyme: Modernism for America, ed. Jennifer Gross, exh. cat. (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Art Gallery, 2006), 190, ill.

Note: This electronic record was created from historic documentation that does not necessarily reflect the Yale University Art Gallery’s complete or current knowledge about the object. Review and updating of such records is ongoing.