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American Decorative Arts
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Designer: Egmont Hegel Arens, American, 1887–1966
Designer: Theodore C. Brookhart, American, 1898–1942
Manufacturer: Hobart Manufacturing Company, founded 1897

“Streamliner” Meat Slicer, Model No. 410

Designed 1940; manufactured 1944–85; this example 1952

Aluminum, steel, and rubber

13 1/2 × 17 1/2 × 19 1/2in. (34.29 × 44.45 × 49.53 cm)
Gift of Randall Garrett, B.A. 1972, M.A. 1975
2006.219.1
The Streamliner meat slicer features the sleek outlines and swelling forms indicative of streamline theory, which greatly influenced American architecture and design during the 1930s. Intended for use in a delicatessen or restaurant, the Streamliner visually evokes functionality and easily disassembles for cleaning and maintenance. The Hobart Manufacturing Company offered this model continuously from 1944 until 1985, proving the success of the design.
Geography: 
Manufactured in Troy, Ohio
Designed in Troy, Ohio
Status: 
Not on view
Culture: 
American
Period: 
20th century
Classification: 
Tools and Equipment
Provenance: 

Kenneth Pierce (Minneapolis, Minnesota); sold 2003 to W. Randall Garrett (New Haven, Conn.); gift 2007 to Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Conn.

Bibliography: 

“Acquisitions, July 1, 2006–June 30, 2007,” Yale University Art Gallery Bulletin (2007): 205–6, ill.

John Stuart Gordon et al., A Modern World: American Design from the Yale University Art Gallery, 1920–1950 (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Art Gallery, 2011), 335–36, no. 234.

Note: This electronic record was created from historic documentation that does not necessarily reflect the Yale University Art Gallery’s complete or current knowledge about the object. Review and updating of such records is ongoing.