Current Exhibitions

Leonardo da Vinci, The Annunciation (detail), ca. 1475–79. Oil on panel. Musée du Louvre, Paris, inv. no. M.I. 598. Photo: Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musées de France (C2RMF), Jean-Louis Bellec

Leonardo da Vinci, The Annunciation, ca. 1475–79. Oil on panel. Musée du Louvre, Paris, inv. no. M.I. 598. Photo: Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musées de France (C2RMF), Jean-Louis Bellec

Leonardo da Vinci and Lorenzo di Credi, A Miracle of Saint Donatus of Arezzo (detail), ca. 1475–85. Oil on panel. Worcester Art Museum, Mass., Theodore T. and Mary G. Ellis Collection, inv. no. 1940.29. Photo: Image courtesy the Worcester Art Museum

Leonardo da Vinci and Lorenzo di Credi, A Miracle of Saint Donatus of Arezzo, ca. 1475–85. Oil on panel. Worcester Art Museum, Mass., Theodore T. and Mary G. Ellis Collection, inv. no. 1940.29. Image courtesy the Worcester Art Museum

Leonardo da Vinci and collaborator, The Triumph of Aemilius Paulus (detail), ca. 1472–73. Tempera on panel. Musée Jacquemart-André, Institut de France, Paris, inv. no. mjap-p 1822.2. Photo: © Studio Sébert Photographes

Leonardo: Discoveries from Verrocchio’s Studio

  • June 29, 2018–October 7, 2018
This landmark exhibition investigates a virtually unknown period in the career of Leonardo da Vinci, one of the most famous artists of the Italian Renaissance. It focuses on Leonardo’s early years as an apprentice in the studio of the sculptor, painter, and goldsmith Andrea del Verrocchio, seeking to identify the young artist’s hand in paintings known to be collaborations with his teacher and fellow pupils. Rather than relying on the claims of previous scholarship, the exhibition restores the primacy of visual evidence, encouraging visitors to look closely and carefully at works side by side. At the core of the exhibition is a pair of predella panels—The Annunciation, from the Musée du Louvre, Paris, and A Miracle of Saint Donatus of Arezzo, from the Worcester Art Museum, Massachusetts—that once belonged to a large altarpiece, the Madonna di Piazza, in Pistoia, Italy. These works have been documented as a commission to Verrocchio and were supposedly executed by another of his apprentices, Lorenzo di Credi; however, both paintings are, in one case entirely and in the other in large part, the work of the young Leonardo. A selection of sculptures, cassone panels, and other paintings lent by international public and private collections—which have each been variously attributed to Verrocchio, Leonardo, Lorenzo, or other lesser-known artists—offers additional points of comparison, helping to clarify the personality of each artist and shedding light on the depth and nature of collaboration in Verrocchio’s workshop.
Exhibition organized by Laurence Kanter, Chief Curator and the Lionel Goldfrank III Curator of European Art. Made possible by the Robert Lehman Foundation.

Selected Exhibition Objects

Bust of Christ
The Virgin in Prayer
The Adoration of the Christ Child with Saint Francis of Assisi Receiving the Stigmata; Tobias and the Angel; Saint John the Baptist in the Wilderness; and the Penitent Saint Jerome
Virgin and Child with Angels Seated on Clouds

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