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Prints and Drawings
Artist: Frances Flora Bond Palmer, American, 1812–1876
Publisher: Currier & Ives, American, active 1834–1907

New York Crystal Palace: For the Exhibition of the Industry of All Nations.

1853

Colored lithograph

sheet: 56.8 × 71.6 cm (22 3/8 × 28 3/16 in.)
Mabel Brady Garvan Collection
1946.9.1625
Eager not to be outdone by the London Crystal Palace of 1851, America opened its own international exhibition of arts and industries—the New York Crystal Palace—amid great fanfare on July 14, 1853, in Reservoir Square, a piece of land that today is partially occupied by the New York Public Library. The Crystal Palace’s 5,272 exhibitors displayed articles such as fine furniture, fabrics, porcelain, jewelry, and metalwork; recent inventions such as fire engines, sewing machines, and steam-powered pumps; and products such as Goodyear’s India rubber goods, Linus Yale’s “Patent Magic Locks,” and guns from the makers Colt, Sharps, and Whitney. Samuel F. B. Morse received a silver medal for his telegraph; Tiffany and Company was awarded a silver medal for its silverware; and Matthew Brady won a bronze medal for his daguerreotypes. Although it had been dubbed “fireproof” at the time of its construction, on October 6, 1858, the Crystal Palace burned to the ground, reportedly in less than half an hour.
Geography: 
Made in United States
Culture: 
American
Period: 
19th century
Classification: 
Works on Paper - Prints
Provenance: 

Mabel Brady Garvan Collection, to 1946; Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Conn.

Bibliography: 

Helen A. Cooper et al., Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness: American Art from the Yale University Art Gallery, exh. cat. (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Art Gallery, 2008), 269–70, no. 161, ill.

Note: This electronic record was created from historic documentation that does not necessarily reflect the Yale University Art Gallery’s complete or current knowledge about the object. Review and updating of such records is ongoing.