American Decorative Arts

The Gallery’s collection of American decorative arts ranges in date from about A.D. 1000 to the present day, with the earliest objects representing the art of indigenous people who lived in North America before European settlement. The Mabel Brady Garvan Collection, renowned for its strength in the colonial and early Federal periods, is the core of the collection and is noteworthy for rare examples of American silver.
"Golden Banana" Valet Chair
Vase
Pair of Candelabra
X Series
Tankard
Chest of Drawers with Doors

About American Decorative Arts

Featuring approximately 20,000 objects in all media, the Yale University Art Gallery’s collection of American decorative arts is among the finest in the United States. Its particular strengths are in the colonial and early Federal periods, due in large part to generous gifts from Francis P. Garvan, B.A. 1897. Yale’s collection of early silver is noted for superior examples from New England, New York, and Philadelphia. The furniture collection comprises outstanding examples from all periods, with particular strength in the 17th, 18th, and early 19th centuries. In addition to the pieces displayed in the Gallery, more than 1,100 examples are held in the Furniture Study.

Also present in the American decorative arts collection are significant holdings in pewter and other metals, as well as glass, ceramics, textiles, and wallpaper. A major addition to the collection occurred in the 1980s, when Carl R. Kossack, B.S. 1931, M.A. 1933, and his family donated more than 7,000 pieces of American silver, with particular concentrations in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. In recent decades, acquisitions have focused on late 19th- and 20th-century objects, including contemporary turned wood, the John C. Waddell Collection of American modernist design, and the Swid Powell Collection.

The department has also developed a website, the Rhode Island Furniture Archive at the Yale University Art Gallery, as a resource for studying furniture making in Rhode Island from the 17th to the 19th century.

The permanent-collection galleries feature a chronological survey of American design from the colonial period to the present day. Thematic cases explore how issues of commerce, gender, religion, and ethnicity are integrated into the American experience.

Search the Rhode Island Furniture Archive

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Note from the Curator

A new installation presents 16 pieces of American studio jewelry from the 1930s to the present day, drawn from a promised gift of Toni Wolf Greenbaum. The jewelry is on view through August 26, 2018, in the third-floor galleries devoted to modern and contemporary design. Greenbaum is a New York–based art historian specializing in 20th- and 21st-century jewelry and metalwork. The author of Messengers of Modernism: American Studio Jewelry 1940–1960, she is currently writing a monograph on modernist jeweler Sam Kramer. Greenbaum has lectured internationally and has curated exhibitions for several museums. She is also an associate professor at Pratt Institute, in Brooklyn, where she teaches a course in theory and criticism of contemporary jewelry. The pieces from Greenbaum’s collection expand on the Gallery’s existing jewelry holdings, presenting further evidence of jewelry’s vital role within the context of 20th-century and contemporary American decorative arts. The gift also brings new artists to the collection, including Harriete Estel Berman, who explores recycled materials; Claire Falkenstein, who captured abstract gestures in brass; and Peer Smed, who worked silver in a traditional method.

Patricia Kane
Friends of American Arts Curator of American Decorative Arts

Art Smith, “Three Hole” Cuff, ca. 1950. Nickel. Yale University Art Gallery, Promised gift of Toni Wolf Greenbaum

Upcoming Symposium

Gilbert Stuart, Francis Malbone and His Brother Saunders, ca. 1773

Mahogany, Species of Elegance: The History and the Science

Oswaldo Rodriguez Roque Memorial Symposium
November 1–2, 2018

The symposium presents an overview of the history of mahogany in Great Britain, North America, and Rhode Island. It also introduces scientific methods that can be used to pinpoint various species of mahogany and explores how the results can enrich our understanding of the furniture and architecture trades in Britain and early America.

Featured Media

Tall clocks were among the most extravagant possessions owned by the elite in colonial America. Multiple craftsmen were involved in their manufacture: a clockmaker assembled intricate works, often using imported gears and parts, and a cabinetmaker fitted the works into custom-built cases. Some clocks were more than timepieces—they were also musical instruments. Musical clocks were complex and costly to produce, and only about 150 American examples are known to survive. This clock in the Gallery’s collection was made shortly after the American Revolution by Benjamin Willard while he was working in Grafton, Massachusetts. When the clock strikes the hour, it triggers a mechanism hidden behind the clock face: a cylinder studded with pins rotates and causes hammers to hit a series of bells and produce a recognizable song. Remarkably, we are able to hear the music much the way it sounded to an eighteenth-century listener because the tone is determined by the pitch of the bells and the rhythm is set by the mechanism that drives the cylinder. Willard’s unusually sophisticated clock plays seven songs—a different tune for each day of the week. In this short video, the clock plays a popular fife march called “Marquis of Granby,” which was first published in London in 1760. Words were added a few years later, with the opening line, “To arms, to arms, to arms, my jolly grenadier.” These lyrics may have resonated with the original owner of the clock, who had just witnessed the young nation’s call to arms.

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Meet the Curators

Patricia E. Kane

Patricia E. Kane, the Friends of American Arts Curator of American Decorative Arts, has been at the Gallery since receiving her M.A. from the University of Delaware, Winterthur Program in Early American Culture, in 1968. She received her PH.D. from Yale in 1987. She oversees collections from the 17th century to the present, pursues research on early American silver and furniture, and is the director of the Rhode Island Furniture Archive.

patricia.kane@yale.edu

Download Patricia Kane’s CV
Patricia E. Kane

John Stuart Gordon

John Stuart Gordon, the Benjamin Attmore Hewitt Associate Curator of American Decorative Arts, first became interested in material culture while studying as an undergraduate at Vassar College. He received an M.A. from the Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, Design, and Culture and a PH.D. from Boston University. His specialty is American design from the late 19th through 21st centuries. In addition, he supervises the Furniture Study, the Gallery’s expansive study collection of American furniture and wooden objects.

john.s.gordon@yale.edu

Download John Stuart Gordon’s CV
John Stuart Gordon

Further Reading

Barquist, David L. American and English Pewter at the Yale University Art Gallery: A Supplementary Checklist. New Haven: Yale University Art Gallery, 1985.

Barquist, David L. American Tables and Looking Glasses in the Mabel Brady Garvan and Other Collections at Yale University, exh. cat. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1992.

Barquist, David L., and Ethan W. Lasser. Curule: Ancient Design in American Federal Furniture, exh. cat. New Haven: Yale University Art Gallery, 2003.

Battison, Edwin A., and Patricia E. Kane. The American Clock, 1725–1865: The Mabel Brady Garvan Collection and Other Collections at Yale University. Greenwich: New York Graphic Society, 1973.

Buhler, Kathryn C., and Graham Hood. American Silver: Garvan and Other Collections in the Yale University Art Gallery. 2 vols. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1970.

Carr, Dennis A. American Colonial Furniture, an Interpretive Guide to the Yale University Art Gallery’s Collection. New Haven: Yale University Art Gallery, 2004.
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Cooper, Helen A., et al. Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness: American Art from the Yale University Art Gallery, exh. cat. New Haven: Yale University Art Gallery, 2008.

Eisenbarth, Erin E. Baubles, Bangles, and Beads: American Jewelry from Yale University, 1700–2005, exh. cat. New Haven: Yale University Art Gallery, 2005.

Freedman, Paula B., and Robin Jaffee Frank. American Sculpture at Yale University. New Haven: Yale University Art Gallery, 1992.

Gordon, John Stuart, et al. A Modern World: American Design from the Yale University Art Gallery, 1920–1950. New Haven: Yale University Art Gallery, 2011.

Hood, Graham. “American Pewter: Garvan and Other Collections at Yale.” Yale University Art Gallery Bulletin 30, no. 3 (Fall 1965).

Kane, Patricia E. 300 Years of American Seating Furniture: Chairs and Beds from the Mabel Brady Garvan and Other Collections. Boston: New York Graphic Society, 1976.

Kane, Patricia E. Art and Industry in Early America: Rhode Island Furniture, 1650–1830, exh. cat. New Haven: Yale University Art Gallery, 2016.

Main, Kari M. Please Be Seated: Contemporary Studio Seating Furniture, exh. cat. New Haven: Yale University Art Gallery, 1999.

Phillips, John Marshall. Early American Silver Selected from the Mabel Brady Garvan Collection. Ed. Meyric R. Rogers. New Haven: Yale University Art Gallery, 1960.

Ward, Barbara McLean, and Gerald W. R. Ward. Silver in American Life: Selections from the Mabel Brady Garvan and Other Collections at Yale University. New York: American Federation of Arts, 1979.

Ward, Gerald W. R. American Case Furniture in the Mabel Brady Garvan and Other Collections at Yale University. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1988.

 

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American Decorative Arts
American Glass: The Collections at Yale
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Art and Industry in Early America: Rhode Island Furniture, 1650–1830
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Exhibition Catalogues
Collection Objects
American Decorative Arts
A Modern World: American Design from the Yale University Art Gallery, 1920–1950

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Collection Catalogues