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Prints and Drawings
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Artist: Celia Calderón de la Barca, Mexican, 1921–1969
Publisher: Taller de Gráfica Popular, Mexico City, founded 1937

Corrido de Diego Rivera (Ballad of Diego Rivera)

1956

Linocut

platemark: 35.6 × 26.5 cm (14 × 10 7/16 in.)
sheet: 40.6 × 30.5 cm (16 × 12 in.)
Gift of Monroe E. Price, B.A. 1960, LL.B. 1964, and Aimée Brown Price, M.A. 1963, Ph.D. 1972
2015.14.5
The corrido (ballad) was a popular genre, consisting of relatively simple verses in praise—as here, and in the Corrido del congreso de la paz (see 2010.175.12)—or any of a wide range of other emotions such as lament or anger, set to a repeated simple tune. Here the subject is Diego Rivera (1886–1957), Mexico’s most famous artist. Rivera, José Clemente Orozco, and David Alfaro Siqueiros worked in murals, seeing them as a medium through which art could be accessible to all. Their style harked back to their Mayan and Aztec ancestors, and thus their work provided the public with a sense of shared history and cultural identity. The fourteen quatrains here, by the eminent Mexican writer Andrés Henestrosa (1906–2008), include the lines: “His words are of silver, his brushes are of gold.” At the top, a man, presumably Rivera, watches two workmen festooning an archway made of Mayan decorative elements. The tune is rendered along the bottom, twice—in the keys of “C” and “D”—with the words of the first quatrain underneath.
Geography: 
Made in Mexico
Status: 
Not on view
Culture: 
Mexican
Period: 
20th century
Classification: 
Works on Paper - Prints - Posters
Provenance: 

Purchased from the Taller de Gráfica by Aimée Brown Price and Monroe E. Price

Bibliography: 

“Acquisitions 2015,” http://artgallery.yale.edu/sites/default/files/files/Pub_Bull_acquisitions_2015_updated%2012_16_15.pdf (accessed December 1, 2015).

Note: This electronic record was created from historic documentation that does not necessarily reflect the Yale University Art Gallery’s complete or current knowledge about the object. Review and updating of such records is ongoing.