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Loan Object
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Photo Credit: Christopher Gardner
Photo credit: Christopher Gardner
PrevNext2 of 2
Photo Credit: Christopher Gardner
Photo credit: Christopher Gardner
Artist: John Hazlitt, British, 1767–1837

British Officer

ca. 1795

Watercolor on ivory

2 5/8 × 2 3/16 in. (6.7 × 5.6 cm)
Promised bequest of Davida Tenenbaum Deutsch and Alvin Deutsch, LL.B. 1958, in honor of Kathleen Luhrs
ILE1999.3.36

Born in England, John Hazlitt was a self-taught artist who began painting portraits in his teens. His family moved to America when he was sixteen, and two years later he was confident enough to advertise his skills as a drawing master along with the artist Joseph Dunkerley. Hazlitt worked as a portraitist and miniaturist, advertising in Salem and Boston. This miniature portraying a British officer was probably commissioned for the officer’s wife or another close family member, to be worn around her neck on a ribbon or chain. The back of the locket features a lock of hair at the center, neatly curled and held in place by a band of small pearls that likely belonged to its sitter, and ray-patterned foil beneath the ruby red glass adds a sparkling effect.

Hazlitt’s family moved back to England in 1787. In London, Hazlitt’s work was exhibited at the Royal Academy every year, from 1788 to 1819, and admired by the renowned portraitist Joshua Reynolds. Hazlitt became part of a circle of other well-known artists and writers in London that included Charles Lamb and Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

Geography: 
Made in London, United Kingdom, England
Status: 
Not on view
Culture: 
British
Period: 
18th century
Classification: 
Miniatures - Jewelry
Provenance: 

Sotheby's, Ed Paine Sale, lot 106, January 29, 1986; Davida Tenenbaum Deutsch and Alvin Deutsch

Note: This electronic record was created from historic documentation that does not necessarily reflect the Yale University Art Gallery’s complete or current knowledge about the object. Review and updating of such records is ongoing.