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Prints and Drawings
Photo credit: Yale University Art Gallery
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Artist: Kate Traumann Steinitz, American, born Germany, 1889–1975

Heads

1925

Watercolor and gouache on paper

sheet: 21.6 × 28.7 cm (8 1/2 × 11 5/16 in.)
Gift of the Estate of Katherine S. Dreier
1953.6.121
Käte Steinitz studied under Lovis Corinth in Berlin before moving to Hanover in 1917. There she thrived under the influence of modernism and met Kurt Schwitters, with whom she and Theo van Doesburg collaborated on the book Modern Typography. Steinitz shared with Schwitters the belief that abstraction and realism were not conflicting practices. Heads and the other two works by Steinitz in the Société Anonyme Collection, however, belie any aesthetic compatibility she might have shared with van Doesburg or Schwitters. Her works can be more clearly understood as influenced by the emotive palette and mannered representational style of German Expressionism. Due to the hardships of World War II, Steinitz immigrated to the United States in 1935 with her husband. They settled in New York where she established herself as the chairman of the New Americans group that exhibited at the World’s Fair in New York in 1940. In the early 1940s, they moved farther west, eventually settling in Los Angeles, where Steinitz came to focus her creative energies as a librarian and scholar.
Geography: 
Made in Germany
Status: 
By appointment
Culture: 
German
Period: 
20th century
Classification: 
Works on Paper - Drawings and Watercolors
Bibliography: 

Ruth L. Bohan et al., The Société Anonyme: Modernism for America, ed. Jennifer Gross, exh. cat. (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Art Gallery, 2006), 183, 206, ill.

Note: This electronic record was created from historic documentation that does not necessarily reflect the Yale University Art Gallery’s complete or current knowledge about the object. Review and updating of such records is ongoing.