American Decorative Arts

Brooch

ca. 1985

Plastic

1 1/2 in. (3.81 cm)
Gift of Jacqueline Loewe Fowler
2012.28.13
The first holographic art exhibition was held at the Cranbrook Academy of Art in Michigan in 1968, and the Museum of Holography was founded in New York in 1976 to share the advancement of this new medium with the public. By the mid-1970s, the mass-production of holograms became possible using an embossing technique. As a result, holograms appeared on printed matter and signage, particularly in the publishing, advertising, and banking industries. National Geographic was the first major publication to put a hologram on its cover in 1984. A number of companies also began producing holographic jewelry, usually involving white-light holograms recorded in dichromated gelatin. These items, such as this brooch, were inexpensive and allowed consumers to own an object that celebrated the holograph’s achievement in art, science, and technology. With its image of a human eye, this brooch can also be interpreted as continuing the tradition of painted-eye miniatures mounted as jewelry.
Culture: 
American
Period: 
20th century
Classification: 
Jewelry
Geography: 
Made in United States
Status: 
Not on view
Bibliography: 

“Acquisitions,” https://artgallery.yale.edu/sites/default/files/files/Pub_Bull_acquisitions_2012.pdf (accessed December 21, 2012).

Note: This electronic record was created from historic documentation that does not necessarily reflect the Yale University Art Gallery’s complete or current knowledge about the object. Review and updating of such records is ongoing.