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American Decorative Arts
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Photo credit: Yale University Art Gallery
PrevNext2 of 2
Photo credit: Yale University Art Gallery
Manufacturer: Mount Washington Glass Company, American, 1876–1907

“Royal Flemish” Ewer, “Lion and Arms” Pattern

1888–95

Blown, enameled, and gilded lead glass

10 7/8 × 5 7/8 × 5 3/4 in. (27.62 × 14.92 × 14.61 cm)
Purchased with a gift from William Bates, Jr., in memory of his wife, Elizabeth Martin Bates
2011.16.1

This ewer is an example of the art glass produced by the Mount Washington Glass Works of New Bedford, Massachusetts. It is in the Royal Flemish pattern, which was first advertised in 1889 but not trademarked until 1893. It was made by dipping a blown or molded crystal glass body into an acid-roughing bath and then decorating it with transparent enamels. The most ambitious pieces of Royal Flemish have raised lines of heavy enamel that emulate the leading of stained-glass windows. Royal Flemish was both expensive and time-consuming to make, requiring the services of a highly skilled artisan. The shape of this example is based on Persian glass and illustrates the late nineteenth-century interest in the exoticism of the Middle East.

Geography: 
Manufactured in New Bedford, Massachusetts
Status: 
On view
Culture: 
American
Period: 
19th century
Classification: 
Containers - Glass
Provenance: 

Steve Morrow Antiques, Hedrick, Iowa, at the Pier Antiques Show, New York, New York, November 13-14, 2010

Bibliography: 

“Acquisitions,” https://artgallery.yale.edu/sites/default/files/files/Pub_Bull_acquisitions_2011.pdf (accessed March 1, 2012).

John Stuart Gordon, American Glass: The Collections at Yale (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Art Gallery, 2018), 206–7, no. 107.

Note: This electronic record was created from historic documentation that does not necessarily reflect the Yale University Art Gallery’s complete or current knowledge about the object. Review and updating of such records is ongoing.