Asian Art
Photo credit: Yale University Art Gallery
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Artist: Kondo Takahiro, Japanese, born 1958

Green Mist

2006

Porcelain with blue and green pigment under metallic silver glaze (ginteki sai), and a cast-glass top

34 1/2 x 7 7/8 x 5 1/2 in. (87.6 x 20 x 14 cm)
Purchased with the Leonard C. Hanna, Jr., Class of 1913, Fund in honor of Louisa Cunningham’s retirement
2010.211.1
Kondō Takahiro integrates the technique of cast glass into the art of ceramics by creating “silver mist” droplets—using a paint mix that contains gold, silver, platinum, and other metals—and applying them to the surface of his works. Green Mist is one of the tallest, simplest, and most sophisticated forms made in the artist’s so-called silver mist technique. Takahiro drew inspiration from his travels to the Orkney Islands in Scotland, where he visited the Ring of Brodgar, a large, five-thousand-year-old circle of stone monoliths. Tall, majestic, and covered in dew and ice, the dilapidated structures rose from the mist and inspired Takahiro’s series Orkney Islands, depicting the monoliths that bridge land and sky.
Culture: 
Japanese
Period: 
Heisei era (1989–2019)
Classification: 
Sculpture
Geography: 
Japan
Status: 
Not on view
Provenance: 

Provenance:
The work was purchased from The Scottish Gallery in London by a private collector, and it has been in California since 2006. Joan B. Mirviss, Ltd. in New York City received it on consignment and planned to have it available for the show opening on November 10, 2010 celebrating the three generations of the Kondo family. We were fortunate to find the work before the opening. Both the consignor, whose parents are Yale graduates, and the dealer are delighted that Green Mist will instead find a home at the Art Gallery.

Bibliography: 

The Works of Takahiro Kondo: All Things in Nature, exh. cat. (Kyoto: Tenmaya Co., Ltd., 2006), no. 20, ill.

Note: This electronic record was created from historic documentation that does not necessarily reflect the Yale University Art Gallery’s complete or current knowledge about the object. Review and updating of such records is ongoing.