Asian Art
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Photo credit: Yale University Art Gallery
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Photo credit: Yale University Art Gallery
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Photo credit: Yale University Art Gallery

Standing Female

6th–7th century

Haniwa: reddish earthenware

Object: 88.9 x 26.7 x 20.3 cm (35 x 10 1/2 x 8 in.), base: 2.2 x 28.5 x 21.6 cm (7/8 x 11 3/16 x 8 1/2 in.)
Gift of Rosemarie and Leighton R. Longhi, B.A. 1967
2009.206.2

Haniwa (literally, "ring of clay") statues are unglazed earthenware sculptures that were made between the third and the sixth century, primarily to protect grave mounds from erosion or to mark burial sites. This tall, standing female statue represents the typical <EM>haniwa</EM><BR>shape: a hollow, cylindrical body sculpted to resemble a human figure. She has two looped bows on her dress and one remaining earring on the left side of her head. The round clay pieces attached to her neckline appear to be the remnant of a necklace, which suggests she could represent a miko, a maiden serving in Shinto rituals. Her lower torso is a simple cylinder that is connected to a longer cylinder, which would be partially buried in the ground.

Culture: 
Japanese
Period: 
Kofun Period (ca. 300-ca. 600)
Classification: 
Sculpture
Status: 
On view*
Note: This electronic record was created from historic documentation that does not necessarily reflect the Yale University Art Gallery’s complete or current knowledge about the object. Review and updating of such records is ongoing.

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