Arts of Islam

The arts of Islam installation in the Mimi Gates Study Gallery introduces a range of works from the 7th to the 20th century. Included are works on paper, ceramics, textiles, metalwork, coins and medals, and architectural elements. The display features works from the Gallery’s departments of African Art, Asian Art, Coins and Medals, and Indo-Pacific Art.
Star-Shaped Dish
Hunter on a Horse
Textile Fragment
Amulet
Bowl with a Scalloped Edge
Goblet

About the Arts of Islam

The collection of the arts of Islam at the Yale University Art Gallery reflects the chronological depth and geographic breadth of this global religion. Works range in date from the seventh to the twentieth century and originate from the Middle East, Iran, South Asia, Indonesia, Africa, and Europe. As part of the Gallery’s 2012 renovation and expansion, the Mimi Gates Study Gallery has been installed with a selection of highlights from the collections, which will support the broad range of teaching related to Islam at Yale. Included are the arts of the book, ceramics, textiles, metalwork, coins and medals, and architectural elements. The works have been selected from the museum’s departments of African Art, Asian Art, Coins and Medals, and Indo-Pacific Art.

The Department of Asian Art has the greatest number of works made by Islamic peoples or bearing Islamic content. The strengths are in textiles and ceramics from the Near East and Iran. The textile collections were given by Mrs. William H. Moore in the 1930s and 1940s. They had been assembled by Phyllis Ackerman and Arthur Upham Pope, and many were included in their monumental publication, A Survey of Persian Art (Oxford University Press, 1938–39). Some of the ceramics were also gifts of Mrs. Moore, but many came from other donors, including Wilson P. Foss, Jr., PH.B. 1913, and members of his family. The collection is especially rich in Mina’i ware. The Foss family was also important in building a collection of early illustrated manuscripts for the Department of Asian Art. In addition to Timurid period manuscripts and later Persian miniatures, the department has strong holdings of Mughal period Indian miniature painting.

In the Department of African Art, most prominent are objects from the Maghreb through the Sahara to the Sahel, bearing import from Arabic, Jewish, and Berber traditions. Some objects come from the Swahili East Coast, and there are also a number of objects from the rest of black Africa exhibiting Islamic motifs. The textiles were again the gifts of Mrs. William H. Moore. Labelle Prussin, PH.D. 1973, has donated a significant group of silver jewelry from North Africa and the Sahara.

The Department of Indo-Pacific Art is rich in textiles that display Islamic content, particularly of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. These textiles are from the Collection of Robert J. Holmgren and Anita E. Spertus, and are promised gifts of Thomas Jaffe, B.A. 1971. There are instances of local forms and traditions being reinterpreted in an Islamic context with, for instance, the appearance of crossed swords or ancestor figures with Islamic-style turbans.

Coins are especially important as documents of the spread of Islam throughout the world. The installation in the Mimi Gates Study Gallery includes an Umayyad coin struck in 714 C.E. in Damascus, representing the earliest dynasty of Islamic rule; a dinar struck in Seville, Spain, under the reign of the Almoravids, a Berber empire that originated in the Sahara and spread across the Maghreb to al-Andalus in the eleventh century; and a coin from the reign of the Mughal emperor Aurangzeb in India in the seventeenth century. Two medals made in Germany commemorate the Venetian doges who fought the Ottoman empire in the 1680s. The collection includes many more Islamic coins, a rich resource for historical research.

The installation of the arts of Islam in the Mimi Gates Study Gallery is designed to complement the broad spectrum of Yale courses that examine Islamic art, culture, history, literature, politics, and religion. It is specifically intended to engage faculty, teaching fellows, and students through course visits, assignments, and research projects. To find out more about how you might take advantage of the Mimi Gates Study Gallery for your course, please contact Kate Ezra, the Nolen Curator of Education and Academic Affairs, at kate.ezra@yale.edu. For more information for faculty and teaching fellows, click here.

Note from the Curators

The Islamic objects in the Mimi Gates Study Gallery are changed every few months, allowing the Gallery to display a greater variety of work and to tailor the installation to the interests of the Yale faculty. The current rotation of textiles features two Indian sashes, one from the late 18th or early 19th century and one from the early 20th century. Both are made from silk and metal-thread brocade, signaling their status as luxury objects. These cloths join a group of Indian Mughal dynasty (1526–1857) manuscript pages that illustrate the great Persian epic Shahnameh (Book of Kings), which tells the history of the rulers of Iran from ancient times until the Arab conquest in 651 A.D. An episode from this same epic is depicted on this bowl, also on view in the gallery. The bowl, from the Seljuk dynasty (1038–1194), depicts three mythological warring kings: Faridun, Kava, and Zahhak.

Kate Ezra

The Nolen Curator of Education and Academic Affairs

David Ake Sensabaugh

The Ruth and Bruce Dayton Curator of Asian Art

Bowl depicting Faridun, Kava, and Zahhak in an episode from Firdawsi’s Shahnameh, Iranian, probably Kashan, Seljuk dynasty (1038–1194) or their successors, late 12th–early 13th century. Mina’i ware; fritware with polychrome enamels on an opaque white glaze. Yale University Art Gallery, Gift of Wilson P. Foss, Jr., Ph.B. 1913

Meet the Curators

Kate Ezra

As the Nolen Curator of Education and Academic Affairs, Kate Ezra develops programs and collaborations across the University to foster teaching and learning from the Gallery’s collection. Before coming to the Gallery, she taught art history at Columbia College in Chicago for 14 years. Prior to that she was curator of African art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, where she organized several major exhibitions of African art and wrote the accompanying exhibition catalogues, including Royal Art of Benin: The Perls Collection (1992), Art of the Dogon: Selections from the Lester Wunderman Collection (1988), and A Human Ideal in African Art: Bamana Figurative Sculpture (1986). Ezra received her ph.d. in Art History with a specialization in African art from Northwestern University.

kate.ezra@yale.edu

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David Ake Sensabaugh

David Ake Sensabaugh, the Ruth and Bruce Dayton Curator of Asian Art and head of the Department of Asian Art, received his master’s and doctoral degrees in Chinese and Japanese art and archaeology from Princeton University and his bachelor’s degree in history from Stanford University. His research interests are in Chinese painting of the 14th and 15th centuries, Chinese pictorial art of the Han and Southern and Northern dynasties, and Chinese gardens. His most recent essays include “Fashioning Identities in Yuan-Dynasty Painting: Images of the Men of Culture” (2009), in Ars Orientalis, and “The Lion Grove in Space and Time,” published in Bridges to Heaven: Essays on East Asian Art in Honor of Professor Wen C. Fong (2011).

david.sensabaugh@yale.edu

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