Ancient Art

The Gallery’s collection of art from the ancient Mediterranean world comprises over 13,000 objects from the Near East, Egypt, Greece, Etruria, and Rome. The collection is also known for its important finds from Yale University’s excavations in the 1920s and 1930s at Dura-Europos (in present-day Syria) and at Gerasa (now Jerash, Jordan).
Kylix with a Symposion Scene
Black-Figure Amphora; A: Birth of Athena; B: Frontal Chariot
Alabastron with Typhon
Ceiling Tile with Heliodoros, an Actuarius
Tyche of Antioch
Shrine to the God Mithras (Mithraeum)

About Ancient Art

The Yale University Art Gallery’s collection of ancient Mediterranean art is displayed in the graceful Sculpture Hall in the 1928 Old Yale Art Gallery building, the chronological installation moving from ancient Babylon through early medieval Europe. Visitors first encounter objects representing the ancient Near East, including Assyrian stone reliefs from the palace of the ninth-century B.C. King Assurnasirpal II, followed by a thematic installation of vases, glass, sculptures, and mosaics from the Greek and Roman civilizations. Subjects explored include politics, theater, daily life, the roles of women and children, representation of the “other,” cult and religion, and commemoration, featuring in particular the Gallery’s strong collections of Greek vases and Roman portraits.

The installation includes an important thematic gallery devoted to Yale’s finds from Dura-Europos. The excavations uncovered one of the earliest Christian churches, a synagogue whose assembly room walls were painted with biblical scenes (now in the National Museum in Damascus, Syria), and a shrine to the mysterious Roman god Mithras. Many other pagan religious buildings surfaced, along with paintings, sculptures, papyri and parchments, coins, arms and armor, and items of daily use such as leather sandals, jewelry, and textiles. The new installation explores themes of daily life, religion, warfare, and funerary practices, with the objects contextualized through the history of their excavation. Highlights of the Dura-Europos gallery include a full-scale reconstruction of the Mithraeum, newly restored wall paintings from the baptistery in the Christian building (including what is among the earliest known images of Christ), decorated ceiling tiles from the synagogue, and rare examples of military equipment (including a complete set of horse armor and painted wooden shields). A computer kiosk with excavation photographs and new imagery allows visitors to explore the site virtually and imagine life in the ancient city; click here to access the digital presentation online.

In the 1920s and 30s, Yale also participated in excavations at Gerasa, whose mosaics represent the best of early Byzantine church mosaic production in Jordan. One of the Gallery’s most important objects is a spectacular sixth-century A.D. floor mosaic with isometric images of Alexandria and Memphis, which had been in storage since the 1940s. Recently completed innovative conservation and installation treatment allow it to be a highlight of the Gallery’s installation.

Note from the Curator

A magnificent portrait statue of a Roman emperor, outfitted in elaborate military dress, is now on view at the Gallery through the fall of 2015, on loan from the Frederick Iseman Art Trust. It will be the focus of the Andrew Carnduff Ritchie Lecture to be given on May 29 by world-renowned art historian Paul Zanker. The marble sculpture, carved in the early first century A.D., originally stood in Salona, capital of the Roman province of Dalmatia. The ruler’s military success is celebrated by the triumphal imagery on the cuirass: two winged victories fastening the armor of the defeated enemy to a tree, overseen by the sun god crossing the heavens in his chariot. Such displays of the enemy’s arms and armor (trophies, from the ancient Greek tropaion) were traditionally erected by victorious armies. This statue’s exceptional quality is evident particularly in the fringed leather straps, which give an impression of motion and texture rarely achieved in marble sculpture. The artist was clearly one of the best of his time, and the statue should be viewed as a true masterpiece of Roman art.

Lisa R. Brody

Associate Curator of Ancient Art

Portrait of an Emperor or General Wearing a Military Cuirass, Roman, Julio-Claudian, early 1st century A.D. Marble. Lent by the Frederick Iseman Art Trust

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Curator Lisa Brody discusses the Gallery’s sixth-century A.D. floor mosaic from Gerasa
in New York at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Meet the Curators

Susan B. Matheson

Susan B. Matheson, the Molly and Walter Bareiss Curator of Ancient Art, oversees the collections of art from the ancient Mediterranean and ancient Americas. She has organized exhibitions on Greek vases, Dura-Europos, and Neoclassical and Gothic Revival Art, and she was cocurator of the exhibition I, Claudia: Women in Ancient Rome in 1996. Her books include Polygnotos and Vase-Painting in Classical Athens, volumes on Yale’s Athenian vases and ancient glass, and Art for Yale: A History of the Yale University Art Gallery. She teaches courses on Athenian vase painting for the departments of Classics and the History of Art at Yale.

susan.matheson@yale.edu

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Lisa R. Brody

Lisa R. Brody, Associate Curator of Ancient Art, received her B.A. from Yale and her Ph.D. from the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University. She has excavated around the Mediterranean and on Yale’s campus, and her publications include Aphrodisias III: The Aphrodite of Aphrodisias. In 2011 she cocurated Dura-Europos: Crossroads of Antiquity, which was on view at the McMullen Museum at Boston College and at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at New York University, and she coedited the accompanying book. She is currently working on an exhibition of art from the Roman provinces.

lisa.brody@yale.edu

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Further Reading

Baird, J. A.“Photographing Dura-Europos, 1928–1937: An Archaeology of the Archive.” American Journal of Archaeology 115 (July 2011): 427­–46.

Baur, Paul V. C., ed. Gerasa: City of Decapolis. New Haven: American Schools of Oriental Research, 1938.

Brody, Lisa R. “Portrait of a Lady: A New Statue at the Yale University Art Gallery.” Yale University Art Gallery Bulletin (2008) 143–47.
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Brody, Lisa R., and Gail L. Hoffman, eds. Dura-Europos: Crossroads of Antiquity, exh. cat. Chestnut Hill, Mass.: McMullen Museum of Art, Boston College, 2011.
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Brody, Lisa R., and Carol Snow. “A Mystery in Marble: Examining a Portrait Statue through Science and Art.” Yale University Art Gallery Bulletin (2010): 31­–45.
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The Excavations at Dura-Europos, Preliminary and Final Reports. New Haven: Yale University Press; Los Angeles: University of California Press; Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1929–2001.

Grossmann, Richard A. Ancient Glass: A Guide to the Yale Collection. New Haven: Yale University Art Gallery, 2002.
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Harrelson, Sam. Asia Has Claims Upon New England: Assyrian Reliefs at Yale. New Haven: Yale University Art Gallery, 2006.

Hopkins, Clark. The Discovery of Dura-Europos. Edited by Bernard Goldman. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1979.

Matheson, Susan B. Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum: Athenian Red-figure and White-ground Vases in the Yale University Art Gallery. Mainz-am-Rhein, Germany: von Zabern, 2011.

Matheson, Susan B. Greek Vases: A Guide to the Yale Collection. New Haven: Yale University Art Gallery, 1988.
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Matheson, Susan B. Ancient Glass in the Yale University Art Gallery. New Haven: Yale University Art Gallery, 1980.
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McCarty, Matthew M. Ancient Bronzes: A Guide to the Yale Collection. New Haven: Yale University Art Gallery, 2006.
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Scott, Gerry D. III. Ancient Egyptian Art at Yale. New Haven: Yale University Art Gallery, 1986.

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