American Decorative Arts

The Gallery’s collection of American decorative arts ranges in date from the 17th century to the present day. The Mabel Brady Garvan Collection, renowned for its strength in the colonial and early Federal periods, is the core of the collection and is noteworthy for rare examples of American silver.
Model No. 1760 "Mesa" Table
Tankard
Sailors' Rights Flask (Turtle Whimsy)
Chest-on-Chest
Tankard
Spring Grass II

About American Decorative Arts

Featuring approximately 20,000 objects in all media, the Yale University Art Gallery’s collection of American decorative arts is among the finest in the United States. Its particular strengths are in the colonial and early Federal periods, due in large part to generous gifts from Francis P. Garvan, B.A. 1897. Yale’s collection of early silver is noted for superior examples from New England, New York, and Philadelphia. The furniture collection comprises outstanding examples from all periods, with particular strength in the 17th, 18th, and early 19th centuries. In addition to the pieces displayed in the Gallery, more than 1,000 examples can be seen by appointment in the Furniture Study.

Also present in the American decorative arts collection are significant holdings in pewter and other metals, as well as glass, ceramics, textiles, and wallpaper. A major addition to the collection occurred in the 1980s, when Carl R. Kossack, B.S. 1931, M.A. 1933, and his family donated more than 7,000 pieces of American silver, with particular concentrations in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. In recent decades, acquisitions have focused on late 19th- and 20th-century objects, including contemporary turned wood, the John C. Waddell Collection of American modernist design, and the Swid Powell Collection.

The department has also developed a website, the Rhode Island Furniture Archive at the Yale University Art Gallery, as a resource for studying furniture making in Rhode Island from the 17th to the 19th century.

The permanent-collection galleries feature a chronological survey of American design from the colonial period to the present day. Thematic cases explore how issues of commerce, gender, religion, and ethnicity are integrated into the American experience.

Search the Rhode Island Furniture Archive

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Note from the Curator

Displayed in a gentleman’s pocket, worn as a lady’s shawl, or waved during rallies, bandannas played a visible role in American political campaigns during the second half of the 19th century. This bandanna commemorates the 1884 presidential campaign of Grover Cleveland and Thomas A. Hendricks. Cleveland secured victory by uniting the Democrats and the reform Republicans, called “Mugwumps,” and became the first Democratic president after the Civil War. Cleveland’s image is based upon an engraving by the Atlantic Publishing and Engraving Company; Hendricks’s image is from an unknown source. The bandanna is from the “Martha Washington” line of textiles produced by S. H. Greene and Sons, one of the largest textile manufacturers in Rhode Island. The “Martha Washington” line was marketed to female consumers, who could not yet vote but still wanted to express their political allegiances. The bandanna is from a collection of American political textiles donated to the Yale University Art Gallery by John R. Monsky, B.A. 1981, and Jennifer Weis Monsky, B.A. 1981, selections from which will be on view in the American decorative arts galleries through November 2016 to coincide with the current presidential election.

Patricia E. Kane

Friends of American Arts Curator of American Decorative Arts

S. H. Greene and Sons, Grover Cleveland and Thomas A. Hendricks Bandanna, Warwick. Rhode Island, 1884. Printed cotton. Yale University Art Gallery, Gift of John R. Monsky, B.A. 1981, and Jennifer Weis Monsky, B.A. 1981

Featured Media

Tall clocks were among the most extravagant possessions owned by the elite in colonial America. Multiple craftsmen were involved in their manufacture: a clockmaker assembled intricate works, often using imported gears and parts, and a cabinetmaker fitted the works into custom-built cases. Some clocks were more than timepieces—they were also musical instruments. Musical clocks were complex and costly to produce, and only about 150 American examples are known to survive. This clock in the Gallery’s collection was made shortly after the American Revolution by Benjamin Willard while he was working in Grafton, Massachusetts. When the clock strikes the hour, it triggers a mechanism hidden behind the clock face: a cylinder studded with pins rotates and causes hammers to hit a series of bells and produce a recognizable song. Remarkably, we are able to hear the music much the way it sounded to an eighteenth-century listener because the tone is determined by the pitch of the bells and the rhythm is set by the mechanism that drives the cylinder. Willard’s unusually sophisticated clock plays seven songs—a different tune for each day of the week. In this short video, the clock plays a popular fife march called “Marquis of Granby,” which was first published in London in 1760. Words were added a few years later, with the opening line, “To arms, to arms, to arms, my jolly grenadier.” These lyrics may have resonated with the original owner of the clock, who had just witnessed the young nation’s call to arms.

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Meet the Curators

Patricia E. Kane

Patricia E. Kane, the Friends of American Arts Curator of American Decorative Arts, has been at the Gallery since receiving her M.A. from the University of Delaware, Winterthur Program in Early American Culture, in 1968. She received her PH.D. from Yale in 1987. She oversees collections from the 17th century to the present, pursues research on early American silver and furniture, and is the director of the Rhode Island Furniture Archive.

patricia.kane@yale.edu

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John Stuart Gordon

John Stuart Gordon, the Benjamin Attmore Hewitt Associate Curator of American Decorative Arts, first became interested in material culture while studying as an undergraduate at Vassar College. He received an M.A. from the Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, Design, and Culture and a PH.D. from Boston University. His specialty is American design from the late 19th through 21st centuries. In addition, he supervises the Furniture Study, the Gallery’s expansive study collection of American furniture and wooden objects.

john.s.gordon@yale.edu

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Further Reading

Barquist, David L. American and English Pewter at the Yale University Art Gallery: A Supplementary Checklist. New Haven: Yale University Art Gallery, 1985.

Barquist, David L. American Tables and Looking Glasses in the Mabel Brady Garvan and Other Collections at Yale University, exh. cat. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1992.

Barquist, David L., and Ethan W. Lasser. Curule: Ancient Design in American Federal Furniture, exh. cat. New Haven: Yale University Art Gallery, 2003.
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Battison, Edwin A., and Patricia E. Kane. The American Clock, 1725–1865: The Mabel Brady Garvan Collection and Other Collections at Yale University. Greenwich: New York Graphic Society, 1973.

Buhler, Kathryn C., and Graham Hood. American Silver: Garvan and Other Collections in the Yale University Art Gallery. 2 vols. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1970.

Carr, Dennis A. American Colonial Furniture, an Interpretive Guide to the Yale University Art Gallery’s Collection. New Haven: Yale University Art Gallery, 2004.
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Cooper, Helen A., et al. Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness: American Art from the Yale University Art Gallery, exh. cat. New Haven: Yale University Art Gallery, 2008.
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Eisenbarth, Erin E. Baubles, Bangles, and Beads: American Jewelry from Yale University, 1700–2005, exh. cat. New Haven: Yale University Art Gallery, 2005.
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Freedman, Paula B., and Robin Jaffee Frank. American Sculpture at Yale University. New Haven: Yale University Art Gallery, 1992.

Gordon, John Stuart, et al. A Modern World: American Design from the Yale University Art Gallery, 1920–1950. New Haven: Yale University Art Gallery, 2011.
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Hood, Graham. “American Pewter: Garvan and Other Collections at Yale.” Yale University Art Gallery Bulletin 30, no. 3 (Fall 1965).

Kane, Patricia E. 300 Years of American Seating Furniture: Chairs and Beds from the Mabel Brady Garvan and Other Collections. Boston: New York Graphic Society, 1976.

Main, Kari M. Please Be Seated: Contemporary Studio Seating Furniture, exh. cat. New Haven: Yale University Art Gallery, 1999.

Phillips, John Marshall. Early American Silver Selected from the Mabel Brady Garvan Collection. Ed. Meyric R. Rogers. New Haven: Yale University Art Gallery, 1960.

Ward, Barbara McLean, and Gerald W. R. Ward. Silver in American Life: Selections from the Mabel Brady Garvan and Other Collections at Yale University. New York: American Federation of Arts, 1979.

Ward, Gerald W. R. American Case Furniture in the Mabel Brady Garvan and Other Collections at Yale University. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1988.

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